Charley Hull: athlete bio

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Charley Hull is a young female golfer competing in “a man’s sport” but nothing will stand in the way of her goal to succeed and win.

Charley has been playing golf and competing for as long as she can remember and knows well the hardships of being alone in an adult environment, where men dominate. 


Undeterred, Charley has become a golfing star in her own right. She may be a young woman in a man’s world, but she sees herself as a professional in a competitive one. She has broken the mould, overcome her demons and is winning big.

The idea that you can inspire the next generation is pretty cool.  Just to give them confidence to really believe in themselves, to show the world what they’ve got … 

20-year-old Charley Hull has already earned a place in British golfing history, despite being a teenage girl in a sport dominated by men.  A child prodigy, she was the youngest player to compete in the Solheim Cup and has a collection of both amateur and professional honours that would be the envy of players twice her age. She also represented Great Britain in the inaugural golf tournament at the Olympic Games Rio 2016.
 

As soon as I picked up a golf club, I was going to be a golfer.

Charley first held a club at the age of 2 and within three years was a member of her local club, playing regularly with her father. “As soon as I picked up a golf club,” she remembers, “I was going to be a golfer”. 

She came to the attention of the wider golf community when she beat a field of adults, in Turnberry, age 9. Two years later, she joined the Woburn Golf Club and aged 14 won the Ladies’ Club Championship. By 16, she was ranked 3rd in World Amateur Golf.

Female athletes are judged more on their physical appearance than their achievements.

But playing golf as a young woman in what Charley describes as “a man’s sport” was not easy. “There are times when you see women aren't getting the same treatment as men and it’s a shame” she says, adding that female athletes are judged more on their physical appearance than their achievements.

She turned professional at 17 and in her first year notched up 5 second place finishes in the Ladies European Tour. This placed her 6th in the Ladies European Tour, earned her the title of Rookie of the Year as well as Best International Newcomer from the Sports Journalists Association. 

One thing I wish I did was prom. Little things like that, you can’t ever get back

But concentrated dedication at such a young age came at a price. She had left school at 13 and her intense schedule meant that she lost touch with friends and felt alone in an adult world: “I think that was the biggest sacrifice I’ve ever made” she says looking back at her younger self. “One thing I wish I did was prom. Little things like that, you can’t ever get back”.

Seeing all the faces in the crowd cheering… it was special.  All of a sudden I didn’t feel so alone

As well as winning the prestigious CME Group Tour Championships and coming second at the ANA Inspiration in 2016, Charley represented the UK at the Olympic Games Rio 2016, where she finished 7th. It was also here that she found resolution: “Seeing all the faces in the crowd cheering… it was special.  All of a sudden I didn’t feel so alone”. 

As a teenaged girl, vying for success in a sport dominated by men, Charley has gone all out for success, no matter what. 

SPORTING ACHIEVEMENTS

  • 7th Rio Olympic Games 2016
  • 2nd ANA Inspirational 2016
  • Winner of the CME Group Tour Championships 2016
  • Ladies European Tour Order Of Merit 2014
  • Ladies European Tour Player of the Year 2014
  • LET Rookie of the Year 2013
  • Best International Newcomer SJA Sports Awards 2013
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